Excerpt for Christmas Elf by , available in its entirety at Smashwords



Christmas Elf



By Arnie Lightning

Arnie Lightning Books

~~~

Smashwords Edition



Copyright © 2015 by Hey Sup Bye Publishing

All rights reserved. This book is a work of fiction. No part of this book or this book as a whole may be used, reproduced, or transmitted in any form or means without written permission from the publisher. Graphics used in this book are licensed and © Dollar Photo Club

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Table of Contents



Free Gift!

The Christmas Elf Series Collection

Tinsel and the Christmas Radio Contest

Tinsel and the Teenage Reindeer

Just for Fun Activity

Tinsel and the Christmas Stocking Deliveries

Just for Fun Activity

Tinsel and the Indoor Snow Party

Just for Fun Activity

Tinsel’s Brilliant Idea

Christmas Jokes

Find the Differences 1

Find the Differences 2

Find the Differences 3

How Many Santas?

Maze 1

Maze 2

Maze 3

Maze 4

Maze Solutions

About the Author



Free Gift!



Download My Free Gift!

Click the link above to instantly download a free eBook! “It’s Okay to Be Different” is a beautifully illustrated story about accepting and celebrating others for their differences. It’s a great way to teach children to appreciate and accept others for who they are. Enjoy!

The Christmas Elf Series Collection

(Collect the Entire Series)

Tinsel and the Christmas Radio Contest



Tinsel, the Chief Christmas Spirit Elf, was very excited. After a whole long year of waiting, the Christmas season was beginning once again. Each year, Santa gave Tinsel special assignments in which he could help children around the world who needed an extra boost of Christmas spirit.

On the day after Thanksgiving, Tinsel bounded eagerly into Santa’s office for his first assignment.

“Ah, there you are, Tinsel!” Santa cried. “Have I got a job for you!”

Tinsel beamed. “Just what I like to hear!”

Santa leaned across his desk, waving a piece of red paper under Tinsel’s nose. “I just got word that there’s a little girl in Boston named Maggie whose family is having a difficult time making ends meet this year. In fact, if they don’t come up with rent money by the New Year, they’ll be kicked out of their house.”

Tinsel gasped. This sounded serious. “But, Santa,” he reminded his boss, “we’re not allowed to give money to the people we help.”

“Not directly,” Santa agreed. “But I feel confident that you’ll find a way to help Maggie and her family.”

Tinsel wasn’t so sure. He’d never failed Santa before—but this assignment seemed so different. He knew he’d need plenty of time to work on it, so he whisked away to Boston as soon as he could.

He found Maggie building a snowman in front of a small, shabby-looking house. Her pink snowsuit was a little too small for her, and Tinsel noticed there were holes in her gloves. Poor Maggie, he thought.

“Hello!” he cried, sprinting over to her with as much cheerfulness as he could muster.

Maggie was so startled, the snowman’s head slipped from her hands and plopped onto the ground. “Who are you?” she asked Tinsel. “You look like an elf.”

“I am indeed an elf!” Tinsel replied. “I’m Tinsel, Santa’s Chief Christmas Spirit Elf, as a matter of fact. And I’m here to give you and your family a very merry Christmas.”

Maggie’s shoulders sagged. “That’s nice of you, Tinsel…but I don’t think anybody could do that—not even an elf. We’re going to lose our house at the end of December. I’ve tried everything I could think of to stop that from happening, and my parents are both working hard, but…”

Tinsel’s interest was piqued by something Maggie had just said. “What have you tried?” he asked the little girl.

Maggie sighed and sat down on the front stoop of her house. A shabby wreath hung on the door behind her. “I’ve shoveled snow and walked dogs for my neighbors,” she told Tinsel. “But that didn’t earn me a lot of money. And then, of course, there was that radio contest…”

“What radio contest?” asked Tinsel.

“One of the rock stations around here is having a contest,” Maggie explained. “Whoever is closest to guessing the date and time that they’ll start playing Christmas music wins a thousand dollars. If I could just win that money, we’d be able to stay in our house, and my parents would have a little more time to search for better jobs. But…”


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